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Activities Europe

Marine Casualty Reporting

 

Contact Email:  ACTEURWatch@uscg.mil
Daytime Phone:        +31-46-443-7699
24-hour Emergency: +31-61-297-9335
Marine Employers Drug Testing Guide

Navigation and Vessel
Inspection Circular

(NVIC) No. 01-15

 Report of Marine Accident,
Injury, or Death

(CG-2692)

  Barge Addendum
(CG-2692A)

Report Of Chemical Drug
and Alcohol Testing
 
(CG-2692B)

 Personnel Casualty Addendum 
(CG-2692C)

Witness Addendum 
(CG-2692D)

Notification Requirements

The marine casualty reporting requirements of Title 46 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR), Part 4 applies to all U.S. flagged commercial vessels that are involved in a marine casualty (as defined below) while operating within the Activities Europe Area of Responsibility; the waters of Africa, Europe and the Middle East.

Initial Notification - Immediatly upon addressing all resultant safety concerns, the owner, operator, agent, master or person in charge of a commercial vessel shall notify the U.S. Coast when a marine casualty has occurred as per 46 CFR, Part 4.05-1. This immediate notification shall be made via telephone or e-mail using the contact information on this page.

Written Report - In addition to the initial notification, a written report of a marine casualty shall be submitted to the U.S. Coast Guard using form CG-2692 within 5 days of the incident as per 46 CFR, Part 4.05-10. The CG-2692 shall be filled out as completely and accurately as possible. The CG-2692 and its addendums may be downloaded from the links in the right panel.

                Note:  Failure to comply with either the immediate notification or the written report of marine casualty requirements can result in a Class I civil penalty of $35,000 per violation and could also lead to action against merchant marine credentials.  

What is a Reportable Marine Casualty?

In accordance with 46 CFR 4.05-1, the following incidents are Reportable Marine Casualties:  

  • An unintended grounding or unintended allision with a bridge
  • An intended grounding or intended allision with a bridge that creates a hazard to navigation, the environment of the safety of a vessel
  • A loss of main propulsion, primary steering or any associated control system that reduces the maneuverability of the vessel
  • An occurrence materially and adversely affecting the vessel's seaworthiness or fitness for service or route
  • A loss of life
  • An injury that requires professional medical treatment beyond first aid, and if the person is employed on a commercial vessel, that renders the person unfit for duty
  • An occurrence causing property damage in excess of $25,000

What is a Serious Marine Incident?

A Serious Marine Incident is any Reportable Marine Casualty as outlined in 46 CFR 4.03-2 which results in any of the following events:

  • One or more deaths
  • An injury to a crewmember, passenger, or other person which requires professional medical treatment beyond first aid and, if the injured party is a crewmember, renders the individual unfit to perform routine vessel duties
  • Damage to property in excess of $100,000
  • Actual or constructive total loss of any vessel subject to inspection under 46 USC 3301;
  • Actual or constructive total loss of any self-propelled vessel, not subject to inspection under 46 USC 3301, of 100 gross tons or more
  • A discharge of oil of 10,000 gallons or more into the navigable waters of the U.S. whether or not resulting from a marine casualty
  • A discharge of a reportable quantity (RQ) of a hazardous substance into the navigable waters of the U.S., or a release of a RQ of a hazardous substance into the environment of the U.S., whether or not resulting from a marine casualty.

Post Casualty Chemical Testing

The marine employer shall have each individual who is directly involved in the incident chemically tested for drug and alcohol use if the casualty is or is likely to become a Serious Marine Incident in accordance with 46 CFR 4.06.

Alcohol -

Alcohol testing shall be completed within 2 hours of when the incident occurred, unless precluded by safety concerns directly related to the incident. In such cases, testing shall be completed no later than 8 hours from the occurrence of the incident.  

Drugs -

Drug testing shall be completed within 32 hours of when the incident occurred.  

Drug and alcohol testing shall be reported to the U.S. Coast Guard on form CG-2692B. The "Federal Chain of Custody Control Form" and the results of the alcohol test shall accompany the CG-2692B. Additionally, the drug test results and the Medical Review Officer's (MRO) report shall be provided to the U.S. Coast Guard when complete.

              Note: Failure to comply with the post casualty chemical testing requirements for either alcohol or drugs can result in a Class I civil penalty of $7,000 per violation and could also lead to action against merchant marine credentials.