Welcome to the First Coast Guard District

The First District is an agile, expert military organization providing the best possible service in Maritime Safety, Homeland Security, National Defense, and Environmental Protection. In all that we do, we strive to earn the respect of the American people; for they are the reason we serve. We are committed to dedicated teamwork and comprised of empowered and inspired individuals who live our core values of honor, respect, and devotion to duty.

First District Commander's Intent

The Commander's Intent encapsulates the vision, mission, and guiding principles by which the women and men of the First Coast Guard District will conduct ourselves and complete our missions. Click here to read full text.

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RT @USCG_Tri_State: The crew of #USCG Cutter Penobscot Bay have quite the view of the @statue_liberty and @newyorkcity today: https://t.co/…
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An MH-60T Jayhawk helicopter from U.S. Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod on deck at Petit Manan Lighthouse. U.S. Coast Guard photo by Aux Bob Trapani
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Ready to BREAK ICE! The CGC PENOBSCOT BAY Northbound on the Hudson River. #opRENEW Photo by our fan (and amazing photographer) Glenn Raymo
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CGC WIRE transiting southbound on the Hudson River north of the Tappan Zee bridge. Photo by LT Hepp
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Congratulations, EM1 Jordan Bushnell, on being named the Enlisted Person of the Quarter for the First Coast Guard District staff! BZ, Shipmate! #DevotionToDuty
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ICYMI: Check out why revenue cutters were so important during the War of 1812! #USCG https://t.co/eUr8Cp35Ps
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Happiness comes in waves. Photo by SN Alexander Harpe, CGC Thunder Bay
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Rhode Island’s tall ship loses power, hits multiple boats before grounding in #NewportHarbor RELEASE:… https://t.co/svshZx917x
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Busy night in Newport. Fortunately, there are no reported injuries. Great job to all the responders from U.S. Coast Guard Station Castle Hill and the Narragansett Bay Task Force who were quickly on scene. RELEASE: https://goo.gl/Ybz2n2
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#CoastGuard Air Station Cape Cod hoists injured fisherman from boat 25 miles east of Nantucket. VIDEO: https://t.co/RNuNmhY7Zb #AlwaysReady
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A helicopter crew from Coast Guard Air Station Cape Cod medevaced a seriously injured fisherman tonight from a fishing boat 25 miles east of Nantucket. The aircrew hoisted the man and flew him to Massachusetts General Hospital. #SAR #USCG
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On Oct. 14, 1944 CGCs EASTWIND and SOUTHWIND captured the Nazi weather and supply vessel EXTERNSTEINE off the coast of Greenland after a brief fire-fight. There were no casualties. The Coast Guardsmen christened their prize-of-war USS EASTBREEZE and placed a prize crew on board. The prize crew was commanded by LT Curtiss Howard and consisted of 36 men. After sailing with the Greenland Patrol for three weeks, EASTBREEZE sailed on to Boston where the Navy renamed it as USS CALLAO. The EXTERNSTEINE was the only enemy surface vessel captured at sea by U.S. naval forces during the war. #CGHISTORY
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Since it's Friday the 13th, here is a list of 13 Old Sailor Superstitions! Anyone have any to add? 1. Re-naming a boat It is bad luck to change the name of the boat. If you do, you must have a de-naming ceremony and officially christen the boat again. 2. Tattoos When tattooing became popular at sea, a rooster and a pig were often tattooed onto sailors’ feet. It was believed these animals would prevent the sailors from drowning by showing them the way to shore. 3. Blood It is unlucky to set off at the start of the fishing season without having first shed some blood in a fight or in an accident. 4. Fishing nets When setting fishing nets it is good luck to use an odd number 5. Hat overboard Losing a hat overboard was an omen that the trip would be a long one. 6. Egg shells Egg shells had to be broken into tiny pieces once an egg was cracked open. This was meant to stop witches coming to the ship to sail in the pieces of shell. 7. Personal grooming Anyone aboard who trimmed their nails, cut their hair or shaved their beard brought bad luck to the ship. 8. Red-heads Red heads were believed to bring bad luck to a ship. If you met one before boarding, the only way to mitigate the bad luck was to speak to them before they could speak to you. 9. Women Women were bad luck on board because they distracted the crew, which would anger the sea, causing treacherous conditions as revenge. However, conveniently for the male crew, naked women calmed the sea, which is why so many figureheads were women with bare breasts. 10. Non-sailing days It was bad luck to sail on Thursdays (God of Storms, Thor’s day) or Fridays (the day Jesus was executed), the first Monday in April (the day Cain killed Abel), the second Monday in August (the day Sodom and Gomorrah were destroyed), and 31 December (the day on which Judas Iscariot hanged himself). 11. No whistling Whistling or singing into the wind was forbidden as it would "whistle up a storm" 12. No farewell It was bad luck for seafaring men’s wives to call out to them or wave goodbye once they stepped out the door to leave for a voyage. 13. Bananas No bananas on board. They were believed to be so unlucky they would cause the ship to be lost. A theory on the perils of bananas at sea (though there are tons) is that a species of deadly spider would hide inside banana bunches. Their lethal bite caused crewman to die suddenly, heightening the fear that banana cargo was a bad omen.
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Who knew our lifesaving team at USCG Station Menemsha were also such charming dancers?! BM2 Boytek, SN Hoppe, SN Galan Jr., and FN Ortega-Santiago visited with the lovely ladies at a local nursing home and danced the night away! Many of the ladies said they had not danced in years and the night created magical memories. Great job, Fellas! #CutaRug #USCG Photos by BMCM Robert Riemer
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Happy Friday! Have paraskavedekatriaphobia? Fear not, we have the watch. #AlwaysReady #Friday13th
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High and Dry! The U.S. Coast Guard Cutter SENECA is in dry dock in New York getting some much needed maintenance and repairs. Don't worry, the cutter will be back in the water soon providing maritime safety and security for the American people. #USCG
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Heartening feature about Renee Pellegrino, daughter of the late Raymond Steele, an able-bodied seaman on the Pendleton, which split in two off Chatham during a blizzard in 1952. Pellegrino was just 18 months old at the time of her father's historic rescue. #USCG
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The Coast Guard’s port state control (PSC) program verifies that foreign flagged vessels operating in U.S. waters comply with applicable international conventions, U.S. laws, and U.S. regulations. PSC exams are done in an effort to reduce deaths and injuries, damage to property or the marine environment, and prevent disruptions to maritime commerce. #HomelandSecurity
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The Boston-based Coast Guard Cutter SPENCER persevered through the long Panama Canal transit safely and with expert seamanship. At the conclusion of the transit, the crew had a port call in Panama and was able to take a few days to relax and talk to their families before departing on the next portion of their patrol. Bravo Zulu, SPENCER crew, for a job well done and good luck in your endeavors! #USCG
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Boating in October can be very different than boating in July. There are important things you can do to keep yourself safe on the water as temperatures cool. #SafeBoating
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Station Point Judith stands ever ready. #SemperParatus Photo by BM3 Anthony J. Sears
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CGC CAMPBELL departed Brooklyn, NY after a 93-day dry-dock at GMD Shipyard Corp. CAMPBELL completed a significant amount of maintenance to the hull, decks, and machinery to ensure mission readiness until the ship is replaced by the Offshore Patrol Cutter. #USCG Photos by: FN Craig Bennett
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#USCG Air Station Cape Cod medevaced a fisherman suffering from chest pains today. Read more here:… https://t.co/Juzgb9rpir
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RT @USCG: The 1st Oct Paratus Report is live! Watch to learn about changes to the enlisted evals., hurricane health screening & tuition ass…
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RT @USCG_NYC: #USCG crews from the NYC area enforced a security zone during President Trump's visit to the @PresidentsCup Golf tournament i…
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Today, #Coastguard Station Menemsha rescued a sea turtle tangled in a lobster pot off Cuttyhunk Island. #LMRhttps://t.co/OP2IS68DHj
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RT @Eweather13: @USCGNortheast cutter Bollard tied up in Middletown CT this am. https://t.co/9ulCoOgRub
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#Coastguard Station Castle Hill saves 5, assists 4 during regatta in Jamestown, Rhode Island. #SARhttps://t.co/TqqWrxdors
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#Coastguard locates Bucksport, ME couple. Reported not in distress.
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#Coastguard is searching for Brendan and Debra Donahoe, Bucksport, ME. Last seen in blue, white 22’ dory cabin cruiser. Call 207-741-5422.
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#Coastguard rescues 2 fishermen off Nash Island, Maine after a wave knocked their boat into rocks disabling it. #SAR https://t.co/lgzt6GAR1i
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RT @BrantPointCG: In the Sound: N winds 10-15 kts becoming NW 5-10 this afternoon. Gusts up to 20 kt. Seas 2-4 ft. Small Craft Advisory sou…
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RT @BrantPointCG: Please stop by the Station on Saturday for tours of the tallship Lynx and CG boats, along with other activities and exhib…
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RT @USCG: On the 75th anniv. of the U.S. military at Guadalcanal, we honor the heroics of Douglas Munro during WWII https://t.co/jKTexv38CZ…
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RT @BrantPointCG: Small Craft Advisory in effect at 11 AM: N winds increasing to 15-20 kts with gusts up to 30. Seas 2-4 ft in the Sound, 8…
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RT @jhcannonjr: @USCGNortheast Outstanding work by @USCGNortheast and Narragansett Fire. A reminder, as well, to stay off the rocks! @Narra
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RT @ABC6: .@USCGNortheast rescuing woman who fell off rocks in #Narragansett https://t.co/fJ8tVgQIx1
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#Coastguard, Narragansett Bay Task Force rescue woman in water near Coast Guard House in Rhode Island. #SAR https://t.co/lwXdpFSTcP
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